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Why does FRAUD go undetected and traditional methods FAIL?

Read Time: 8 minutes

Executives don’t trust new data techniques

A study conducted by Deloitte Financial Advisory Services polling more than 2600 executives found that less than a third of respondents were deploying the kind of data analytics tools that can detect fraud or waste by vendors and or employees. Another 13% had the necessary tools but were still learning to use them, while 22% had no data analytics of any kind. The study drew upon conclusions that many managers do not understand “the power of analytics and many companies harbour an attitude of ‘it can’t happen here” (Bowman, 2014).

In an increasingly competitive world, where more services are offered via the Internet, the instances of fraud and opportunities for fraud are reported to be increasing dramatically. Under these cost-focused and tight-margin business conditions, managing the costs of fraud can be the difference between profit and loss. The organisations that reduce the risk of fraud gain an important competitive advantage over those that don’t.

Surprisingly, the study found that data analysis is not used very much to detect corporate fraud. Considering the reams of data that is now commonly available from data and technology companies such as credit bureaus, you would believe that adopting new data techniques to detect and prevent fraud would be a slam dunk for any organisation operating in South Africa in the wake of recent corporate fraud and State capture scandals.

Only one third of companies polled were deploying the kind of data analytics tools that can detect fraud or waste by vendors and or employees. Another 13% had the necessary tools but were still learning to use them, while 22% had no data analytics of any kind (Bowman, 2014).

In South Africa however, the number of organisations that use new data techniques to detect and prevent fraud suggest that many companies are not sold on the idea. Some do not understand what analytics can do for them. Others balk at the expense. And still, others feel they do not need it unless a major fraud actually occurs. If a detection program is going to succeed, it must have access to reliable data and be trusted to perform according to expectations. Executives must have confidence that the analytics will work.

Fraud among employees, suppliers and their subcontractors can take many forms. Those with the largest financial impact involves collusion between a company employee, usually in a procurement role and an outside party and or an unreported or undetected conflict of interest.

How can technology improve the efficiency of the fraud detection process?

The availability of data from credit bureaus, social media platforms and publicly available data sources provides companies with the ideal opportunity to build lifestyle assessment solutions that continually detect and prevent employee fraud and collusion. This can be done by identifying lifestyle behaviours that cannot be supported by the individual or household earnings. By implementing this type of technology, you will be able to make risk-based decisions and enjoy the 360-degree view of fraud or corruption risk that threatens your organisation.

Some of the areas where data exists and technology can enable organisations to undertake automated lifestyle assessments to detect and prevent fraud include the following:

Identity documents: to ensure that the identity number which employees present to their employer is valid, has been issued to them and does not belong to someone else or to someone who is deceased.

Financial distress: to determine whether the employee experiences financial distress by considering their financial status, levels of expenditure or whether they have a financial judgment against them.

Financial irregularities: The movement of money due to corrupt activities is one of the key aspects which investigators look for when tracing corrupt practices. People involved in corrupt practices do their level best to shield their transactions from scrutiny.

Income that exceeds earnings: By detecting and identifying income that is materially in excess of salaried earnings that has not been declared to your organisation, could be a source of risk.

Spousal earnings: Financial risk indicators should be considered in conjunction with family earnings to ensure that you are not detecting false positives or genuine sources of additional income, such as from investments or independent directors’ fees. Equally, there are cases that have been discussed where business relationships and income were routed through family members or spouses. This can be an important area of consideration when you are looking for elements of collusion.

Cellphones: Flag employees with unusually large numbers of cell- phones connected to their names. Determine whether any of those cellphones have been blacklisted or blocked by the mobile networks or whether the number given is non-existent.

Politically Exposed Persons: In the wake of the Guptas and State capture, Politically Exposed Persons (PEPs) have greater prominence in the South African business landscape. Although not all persons who are PEPs pose a risk to business, not knowing a person is a PEP could expose your organisation to risk or disqualify you from trading with British or US companies.

Social media activities: These days, social media activity is pervasive. Significant numbers of employees have caused damage to their employers’ reputation, sometimes resulting in crisis and financial loss as a result of social media postings.

Undeclared commercial interests: Undeclared commercial interests that result in a conflict of interest are considered leading indicators of risk. You should ensure that you compare these results with your declarations of interests and remove any results for deregistered companies etc, other than companies that were liquidated through a judicial order etc.

By using technology to monitor the risks you have identified on a continuous basis, you can use the data and the results to make better risk decisions and to protect the reputation of the company and ultimately, generate greater returns for shareholders and the community.

New data techniques make fraud detection more reliable

Your company should not have a one-sized fits all approach to fraud detection and the use of technology. Being overly reliant upon traditional methods or being solely tied to “in-house” systems are some of the factors that we identified as a weakness in companies we interviewed.

Here are five benefits we have found that are realised from using new data techniques to detect and prevent fraud:

  • Increasing productivity and profitability
    One of the most significant advantages of using decision-making models is to exponentially improve productivity and profitability. Processing hundreds of thousands of applications in an hour is nothing for a decision-making model, whereas only a handful of applications could be properly processed by a human being.
  • Decisions are more consistent
    By automating the decision-making process, you can be sure that the same methodology is used each time an application is processed. The decision-making model can even consider factors such as your definition of an acceptable criminal past, if any (for example non-violent misdemeanours involving speeding), the position (accounting department, factory floor or elder/childcare), the place you are considering placing a person (locations that have been identified as risk hotspots etc), or even the types of claims that have been filed against an individual (eviction notices, tax liens, bankruptcies).
  • Impartial decision-making
    Decision-making becomes largely objective and impartial when using a decision-making model. Unintended discrimination based on subjective or unwanted factors such as race, ethnicity, age or gender can be reduced to significantly or even be wholly eliminated. We do not collect or report in our solution upon race, ethnicity, religious or political affiliation for example.
  • Ability to customise your decision-making model
    While scoring models are certainly not unique (we are all accustomed to looking at our credit score to ascertain whether we can afford a new house), client customisable decision-making models are certainly less discussed and less understood.
  • Quality reporting and improved governance reporting
    The final valuable differentiator is the way that we report the results to you. You do not simply see one final “numeric score” and recommendation. Rather, you will see the results of each input that goes into the decision so that you can understand what gave rise to the output of the decision-making model – the score and the recommendation. This empowers your organisation to explain the results to the executive team or even to contextualise the results where your business model allows for it.

Harness the power of automated technology

Corporate Insights have developed a one-of-a-kind modular system that combines TransUnion’s big data universe with our own artificial intelligence and smart logic algorithms. It enables you to continually monitor, detect, act on and prevent critical risks, both internally and externally.

The Corporate Insights system will allow you to protect your business from succumbing to the typical pitfalls that lead to corruption. It also comes with a host of additional benefits to ensure your company continues to operate optimally, free of the threat of corruption.

Reference

Bowman, R. 2014. “Companies are failing to detect financial fraud in supply chains: Deloitte.” 16 April.
Accessed at
https://www.forbes.com/sites/robert-bowman/2014/04/16/companies-are-failing-to-detect-financial-fraud-in-supply-chains-deloitte/?sh=20c23204642a

Full report
Link: https://www.flipsnack.com/icfp2021/forensic-practitioner3-2021.html

Build an ethical Organisation

Read Time: 5 minutes

The challenge facing leaders to run ethical organisations is not a new one, nor is it limited to South Africa. As far back as 2800BC the first recorded case of corruption was captured on a (stone) tablet around, while there are records of corruption seeping into the judiciary in Egypt from as early as 3100 BC. More recently the business that received the largest fine amounting to $2.9 billion by the United States Department of Justice in term of the Foreign Corruption Practice Act was Goldman Sachs which goes hand in hand together with significant reputational harm. South Africa was recently ranked 70 out of 198 on the corruption perception index with a score of 44 out of 100, which is not surprising given the extent of State Capture which entangled both private and public sector in an orgy of bribery.

As we have read while corruption is nothing new, it has run rampant through government and private companies for thousands of years, despite the actions taken against it. To truly stamp out corruption, it needs to be detected before it can happen, not merely punished once its already done the damage.

while corruption is nothing new, it has run rampant through government and private companies for thousands of years, despite the actions taken against it.

Compliance and managing risk have become a complex and expensive exercise for organisations. Often leaders engage in a matrix of tick box exercises in order to not fall foul of regulatory requirements, but do these activities actually translate into meaningful risk management and in turn into ethical organisations?

Governance is a key element of running an ethical business and there are various systems and programmes that organisations have in place in order to have a value driven organisation. The reality is that fraud and corruption is often committed under one’s own roof – or by those strongly associated with your business – and your biggest corruption threat tends to be closer than you think. To detect and prevent fraud and collusion, you need to properly know both your employees and your suppliers.

With global fraud at an all time high, achieving an ethical organisation remains a challenge. 50% of companies have experienced a fraud incident in the last twenty-four months and the frauds are mostly equally split between internal and external perpetrators. The question to ask is, is your risk management and compliance system delivering on what you think it is? You would do well to investigate, because the ACFE reports that fraudsters often display certain warning signs or red flags that they are engaging in illicit activity. Is your system noticing those warnings? Forensic departments are overwhelmed, and organisations are failing to respond effectively.

50% of companies have experienced a fraud incident in the last twenty-four months and the frauds are mostly equally split between internal and external perpetrators.

Only one third of companies we polled were deploying the kind of data-analytics tools that can detect fraud or waste by vendors and or employees. Another 13% had the necessary tools but were still learning to use them, while 22% had no data analytics of any kind. It is small wonder then that traditional lifestyle assessments don’t protect businesses against fraud and corruption.

Knowing what to look for is part of protecting your business. Understanding what questions to ask is one of the first steps in ensuring you are putting together a working detection and prevention framework to safeguard your business against corruption.

Current initiatives to tackle these almost overwhelming challenges tend to be manual and costly. Deploying technology more effectively will be able to help boards to zone in on risk and unethical behaviour within organisations and engage in corrective action which will be less disruptive to operations, be more accurate and less expensive and drive the ethical values that the organisations strive for.

Using big data together with innovative technology has become a necessary tool to organisations to root out corrupt behaviour and drive a more ethical culture where the organisation can thrive. Ensuring your business is protected is crucial to its survival. Traditional systems do not effectively manage fraud and corruption 24-7 and too often the damage is already done, once the red flags have been observed.

Using big data together with innovative technology has become a necessary tool to organisations to root out corrupt behaviour and drive a more ethical culture where the organisation can thrive.

Corporate Insights has developed a one-of-a-kind modular system that is powered by TransUnion’s big data universe. Corporate Insights’award-winning solutions offer artificial intelligence and smart logic algorithms to detect and prevent risk and compliance failures. The Award-winning solution enables you to use ‘always on’ data to detect, act on, and prevent critical risks, both internally and externally.

In a fiercely competitive marketplace, reputation is everything, so protecting your organization from damaging impacts of fraud and corruption is imperative. Corporate Insights Lifestyle Assessment solution uses big data analytics and automated insights to empower businesses to reliably, continually, and discreetly monitor employees and vendors for early warning signs. That way you are well-positioned to prevent potential threats by taking swift action — keeping your bottom line and ethical integrity intact.

The new normal, brings a new age fraudster

Read Time: 4 minutes

While businesses throughout South Africa shift more of their operations online, in a bid to become more competitive in response to the challenges of the COVID pandemic and subsequent lockdowns, it appears that fraudsters and scammers are embracing this ‘new normal’ by finding ways to exploit opportunities through on-line transactions.

Our data partner TransUnion, in their recently published playbook “Digital Fraud Strategies: What to expect and how to prepare” share insights into industry segments that have accelerated during the pandemic. Financial transactions through net banking, on-line medical transactions, on-line insurance and phishing and pharming have seen spikes of between 15% and 50% for the relevant sectors.

During lockdown, up to 1 in 4 South Africans surveyed confirmed they had experienced a COVID-19 related fraud scam, while 20% of them said they fell victim to it.

Growing Fraud Estimates

Regulatory DataCorp[1] estimate a more than 40% increase in cyber criminal activity for the two years following the Great Recession’s 2009 peak. Their findings estimate that;

  • Fraudsters take advantage of those in need of income and are more susceptible to internet and phone schemes
  • Corporate budget cuts can include security departments, leaving private data at greater risk of breach by cyber criminals
  • Skilled technology workers who lose their jobs may retaliate by perpetrating criminal acts against their former employer

A number of government departments have issued comm uniques warning suppliers and tender participants about fraudulent RFQs (request for quotations) in which suppliers have fallen victim and lost millions of Rands. A government gazette in September 2021 shared important information about the scam: “The scam involves the fraudsters using the letterhead of GPW to send out fake tender bids to companies and requests to supply equipment and goods. Although the contact person’s name on the letter may be of an existing official, the contact details on the letter are not the same as the Government Printing Works,” it said. “The banking details are in a private name and not a company name.”

Due to the accelerated adoption of digital technology and remote working, TransUnion’s playbook estimates that some of the top fraud risks that are anticipated include:

  • Synthetic identity fraud
  • Transaction payment fraud
  • First and third party fraud

In summarising their findings from data obtained from several financial crises, they propose fraud is increasing and employees are increasingly committing economic crime.

 The duration and extent of fraud can run over a considerable period of time, sometime many years. National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) regional spokesperson, Monica Nyuswa[2], said a former 62 year old SASSA employee, who had been bust for fraud lasting more than a decade, was convicted of fraud and uttering in the Middelburg Commercial Crimes Court recently.

Digital & Fraud Treatment Strategies

In dealing with the challenge of faceless contact in transactions and conducting business, organisations are expecting improvements in transaction experience by making them simple, automated, robust and complete. Organisations should adopt end-to-end point solutions for improved fraud prevention and consumer experiences.

In a fiercely competitive marketplace, reputation is everything, so protecting your organization from damaging impacts of fraud and corruption is imperative. We have developed a solution that customers have said accurately detects risks in employee lifestyle and financial behaviour to enable organisations to detect risk events ahead of time. The systems and data are intuitive to use and can be seamlessly and swiftly integrated into an organisations existing processes and reports. We have integrated bank account verification into our products so organisations need not be exposed to the types of fraudulent scams publicised by recent government gazetted warnings of new scams.

Corporate Insights Lifestyle Assessment solution uses big data analytics and automated insights to empower businesses to reliably, continually and discreetly monitor employees and vendors for early warning signs. That way you’re well-positioned to prevent potential threats by taking swift action — keeping your bottom line and ethical integrity intact. Read more here

[1] Source: Regulatory DataCorp “Technology, Cybercrime, and Recessions: An Untimely Trio”

[2] https://www.msn.com/en-za/news/other/sassa-official-bust-for-fraud-after-more-than-a-decade/ar-AAOfzGO?ocid=entnewsntp

What you should consider when wanting to detect fraud

Read Time: 4 minutes

Protecting your business from fraud and corruption is paramount, with the damage caused to your finances – and reputation – leaving long-lasting, and perhaps even irreparable, damage.

Recent allegations of procurement fraud and corruption cases in South Africa during the Covid-19 pandemic have continued to show us how prevalent fraud and corruption are in the country, with the scandals that have erupted within the health sector, in particular a timely reminder of how we need to be alert to red flags.

The reality is that fraud and corruption is often committed under your own roof – or by those closely associated with your business – andyour biggest corruption threat could be closer than you think. To detect and prevent fraud and collusion, you need to properly knowboth your employees and your suppliers.

But is your system delivering on what you think it is? You would do well to investigate, because ACFE reports that fraudsters often display certain warning signs or red flags that they are engaging in illicit activity. Is your system picking up on those warnings?

You would do well to investigate, because ACFE reports that fraudsters often display certain warning signs or red flags that they are engaging in illicit activity.

And if it is, do you know how to find them?

Only one third of companies we polled were deploying the kind of data-analytics tools that can detect fraud or waste by vendors and or employees. Another 13% had the necessary tools but were still learning to use them, while 22% had no data analytics of any kind. It’s small wonder then that traditional lifestyle assessments don’t protect businesses against fraud and corruption.

Knowing what to look for is part and parcel of protecting your business. Understanding what questions to ask is one of the first steps in ensuring you are putting together a working detection and prevention framework to safeguard your business against corruption.

Perception over reality

Speaking with decision-makers in local businesses, several themes and trends have taken shape, both in terms of what executives are looking for in protecting their businesses from fraud and corruption and the perceptions they have of traditional lifestyle audits and monitoring systems.

Recent surveys and our own research have found:

  • Nearly 20% of fraud was attributed to suppliers
  • 14% of fraud was attributed to Employees or collusion
  • Nearly 15% of employees have either undisclosed commercial interests, income or unexplained wealth
  • 95% of all businesses have experienced employee theft.
  • Nearly 40% (37.5%) of employees have stolen from their employer.
  • 3 out of 10 employee theft cases lasted for more than five years.
  • Employee fraud cases can last more than 10 years and cost an average of $5.4 million!

The executive is often concerned with the high costs of traditional lifestyle audits/assessments, consider them having a negative impact on employee moraleand time-consuming.Until now, there was no simple solution available to combat the threat of fraud and corruption.

The executive is often concerned with the high costs of traditional lifestyle audits/assessments, consider them having a negative impact on employee moraleand time-consuming. Until now, there was no simple solution available to combat the threat of fraud and corruption.

It is true that traditional lifestyle assessments aren’t reliable in detecting fraud and corruption. They are often employed after it has already occurred and they can be time-consuming and costly. Our solution, however, continuously monitors your business and picks up fraud and corruption before it happens, by ensuring you properly know your employees and suppliers.

Below the executive, in procurement, IT and legal departments, there are several valid concerns that have been revealed in our research, namely:

POPIA compliance: How does the collection of employee/supplier data comply with the POPIA Act?

Integrity of Data: Who owns the data collected? How will it be protected/destroyed?

Value for Money / Cost: Is a continuous, 24-7 monitoring system cost-effective?

IT Security: What measures are in place to protect against a security breach?

We have worked with compliance and legal experts in addition to TransUnion’s compliance and legal professionals to ensure that we provide a solution that respects the privacy of your employees and suppliers but is also compliant with POPIA and the NCA, besides ensuring that our solution delivers what you want it to do.

Ensuring your business is protected is crucial to its survival. Traditional systems do not effectively monitor fraud and corruption 24-7 and too often the damage is already done, once the red flags have been observed.

To find out how best to protect your business from fraud and corruption, get in touch and book a demo: https://corporateinsights.co.za/contact-us/

Why does fraud go undetected and traditional methods fail

Read Time: 8 minutes

In an increasingly competitive world, where more services are offered via the internet, the instances of fraud and opportunities for fraud are reported to be dramatically increasing. Under these cost focussed and tight margin business conditions, managing the costs of fraud can make the difference between profit and loss. The organizations that reduce the risk of fraud gain an important competitive advantage over those that don’t.

For more on why Auditors Fail to Detect Fraud read out previous blog
(https://corporateinsights.co.za/why-detection-systems-fail-to-capture-corruption/)

Executives Don’t Trust New Data Techniques

Astudy[i] by Deloitte Financial Advisory Servicespolling more than 2,600 executives found that fewer than a third of respondents were deploying the kind of data-analytics tools that can detect fraud or waste by vendors and or employees. Another 13% had the necessary tools but were still learning to use them, while 22% had no data analytics of any kind. The study drew upon conclusions that many managers do not understand “the power of analytics and many companies harbour an attitude of “it can’t happen here.”

Fraud among employees, suppliers and their subcontractors can take many forms. Those with the largest financial impact involves collusion between a company employee, usually in a procurement role, and an outside party and or an unreported or undetected conflict of interest. Surprisingly, the study found that data analysis is not used very much to detect corporate fraud. Considering the reams of data that is now commonly available from data and technology companies such as credit bureaus, you would believe that adopting new data techniques to detect and prevent fraud would be a slam dunk for any organisation operating in South Africa today in the wake of recent corporate fraud and state capture scandals.

Only one third of companies polled were deploying the kind of data-analytics tools that can detect fraud or waste by vendors and or employees. Another 13% had the necessary tools but were still learning to use them, while 22% had no data analytics of any kind

In South Africa, however, the number of organisations that use new data techniques to detect and prevent fraud suggest that many companies aren’t sold on the idea. Some don’t understand what analytics can do for them. Others balk at the expense. And still others feel they don’t need it unless a major fraud actually occurs. If a detection program is going to succeed, it must have access to reliable data and be trusted to perform according to expectations. Executives must have confidence the analytics will work.

So how can technology improve the efficiency of the fraud detection process?

The availability of data from credit bureaus, social media platforms and publicly available data sources provides companies with the ideal opportunity to build lifestyle assessment solutions that continually detect and prevent employee fraud and collusion. This can. Be done by identifying lifestyle behaviours that cannot be supported by individual or household earnings. By implementing this type of technology, you will be able to make risk-based decisions and enjoy the 360-degree view of fraud or corruption risk that threatens your organisation.

Some of the areas that data now exists and technology can enable you to undertake automated lifestyle assessments to detect and prevent fraud are;

  • Identity documents: to ensure that the Identity Number that employees present to you is valid, issued to them and does not belong to someone else or someone who is deceased.
  • Financial distress: to determine whether the employee is in financial distress by considering their financial status, levels of expenditure or they have a financial judgement against them.
  • Financial irregularities: Movement of money during corrupt activities is one of the key things that investigators look for when tracing corrupt practices. People involved in corrupt practices do their level best to shield their transactions from scrutiny.
  • Income that exceeds earnings: By detecting and identifying income that is materially in excess of salaried earnings that has not been declared to your organisation, could be a source of risk.
  • Spousal earnings: Financial risk indicators should be considered in conjunction with family earnings to ensure that you are not detecting false positives or genuine sources of additional income, such as from investments or independent directors’ fees. Equally, there are cases that have been discussed where business relationships and income was routed through family members or spouses. This can be an important area of consideration when you are looking for elements of collusion.
  • Mobile phones: Flag employees with unusually large numbers of mobile phones connected to their names. Determine if any of those mobile phones have been blacklisted or blocked by the mobile networks or if the number given is non-existent.
  • Politically Exposed Persons: In the wake of the Guptas and State Capture, politically exposed persons (PEPs) have greater prominence in the South African business landscape. Although not all persons who are PEPs pose a risk to business, not knowing a person is a PEP could expose you to risk or disqualify you from trading with UK or US companies.
  • Social Media Activity: Social media activity today is pervasive. Significant numbers of employees have caused damage to their employers’ reputation, sometimes resulting in crisis and financial loss as a result of social media postings.
  • Undeclared commercial Interests: Undeclared commercial interests that result in a conflict of interest are considered leading indicators of risk. You should ensure that you compare these results with your declarations of interests and remove any results for deregistered companies etc, other than companies that were liquidated through a judicial order etc.

By using technology to monitor the risks you have identified on a continuous basis, you can use the data and the results to make better risk decisions and to protect the reputation of the company and ultimately, generate greater returns for shareholders and the community.

By using technology to monitor the risks you have identified on a continuous basis, you can use the data and the results to make better risk decisions and to protect the reputation of the company and ultimately, generate greater returns for shareholders and the community.

New Data Techniques make fraud detection more reliable

Your company should not have a one-sized fits all approach to fraud detection and the use of technology. Being overly reliant upon traditional methods or being solely tied to “in-house” systems are some of the factors that we identified as a weakness in companies we interviewed.

Here are five benefits we have found that are realised from using new data techniques to detect and prevent fraud:

  1. Increasing Productivity and Profitability
    One of the most significant advantages to using decision-making models is to exponentially improve productivity and profitability. Processing hundreds of thousands of applications in an hour is nothing for a decision-making model, whereas only a handful of applications could be properly processed by a human being.
  2. Decisions Are More Consistent
    By automating the decision-making process, you can be sure that the same methodology is used each time an application is processed. The decision-making model can even consider factors like your definition of an acceptable criminal past, if any (for example non-violent misdemeanours involving speeding), the position (accounting department, factory floor or elder/childcare), the place you are considering putting a person (locations that have been identified as risk hot spots etc), or even the Types of claims that have been filed against an individual (eviction notices, tax liens, bankruptcies)
  3. Impartial DecisionMaking
    Decision making becomes largely objective and impartial when using a decision-making model. Unintended discrimination based on subjective or unwanted factors such as race, ethnicity, age or gender can be reduced to significantly or even be wholly eliminated. We do not collect or report in our solution upon race, ethnicity, religious or political affiliation for example.
  4. Ability to Customize Your Decision-Making Model
    While scoring models are certainly not unique (we are all accustomed to looking at our credit score to ascertain whether we can afford a new house) client customizable decision-making models are certainly less discussed and less understood.
  5. Quality Reporting and Improved Governance Reporting
    The final valuable differentiator is the way that we report the results to you. You do not simply see one final “numeric score” and recommendation. Rather, you see the results of each input that goes into the decision so that you can understand what gave rise to the output of the decision-making model – the score and the recommendation. This empowers your organization to explain the results to the executive team or even to contextualise the results where your business model allows for it.

Harness the power of automated technology

Corporate Insights has developed a one-of-a-kind modular system that combines TransUnion’s big data universe with our own artificial intelligence and smart logic algorithms. It enables you to continually monitor, detect, act on, and prevent critical risks, both internally and externally.

The Corporate Insights system will allow you to protect your business from succumbing to the typical pitfalls that lead to corruption. It also comes with a host of additional benefits to ensure your company continues to operate optimally, free of the threat of corruption.

Click here to book a demonstration or call us today to find out how you can transform your business.